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Private MacMillan Clarke Van Vlack

Male 1898 - 1918  (19 years)


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  • Name MacMillan Clarke Van Vlack 
    Title Private 
    Born 12 Sep 1898  Waupoos, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 20 Jun 1918 
    Buried Penrith Cemetery, Westmoreland, United Kingdom Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I25829  All
    Last Modified 5 Apr 2008 

    Father George Albert Van Vlack,   b. 27 May 1854, Prince Edward County, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 May 1931, N. Marysburgh, Prince Edward County, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years) 
    Mother Florence Evelyn Plews,   b. Abt 1871,   d. Bef 1911  (Age ~ 40 years) 
    Married 3 Oct 1895  Hallowell Township, Prince Edward County, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F7563  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Headstones
    PLOETHNER, Sgt William and Private M.C. VAN VLACK
    PLOETHNER, Sgt William and Private M.C. VAN VLACK

  • Notes  Died:
    • Military Funeral At Penrith

      On Tuesday, for the second time in ten days, the soldiers of the Canadian Forestry Corps stationed at Penrith and Cliburn assembled at the Penrith Cemetery to pay their last tribute of respect to a dead comrade and on this occasion the remains of Private W. Van Vlack, of the Cliburn Company were interred alongside those of Sergt. Ploethner, who was killed a fortnight ago.

      Private Van Vlack, who was only 19 years of age, came from Picton, Ontario. For some weeks he had been seriously ill and despite every care and attention at Fusehill War Hospital at Carlisle he passed away on Sunday. The news of his death became speedily known in Penrith and neighbourhood, and it created a painful impression, because the young soldier had made many friends. He had acted as motor driver for Major Walker, the officer commanding at Cliburn, and in that capacity was well known in Penrith, while the relations between his major and he were of a most intimate nature.

      The funeral was hurriedly arranged for Tuesday afternoon, and was in every way impressive, it being the express wish of the commanding officer that full military honours should be paid. With this object in view Major Walker obtained the services of the band of the South Lancashire Regiment, which was in the town in connection with the rally of the members of the O.M.A..A..C. and the Womenís Land Army . The attendance of the general public was very large, and while no doubt many were attracted by the military nature of the ceremony, several people attended with a genuine desire to show their sympathy and respect. It had been again wisely decided to exclude the public from the Cemetery, and only the deceasedís comrades were at the graveside.

      The coffin had been taken to the Drill Hall, and it was from there that the funeral procession started. The coffin, covered with the flag and surmounted with the soldierís cap, was carried on the carriage used a fortnight ago. The firing party marched first, then followed the band, and then a detachment of about fifty men from Cliburn, under Lieut. And Adjutant Reeve, and about the same number from the Beacon, under Lieut. and Adjutant Glanfield. The service at the church and at the grave was conducted by the chaplain, Capt. Edminson.




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